Interview with Summer Edward, Founder of Anansesem Caribbean Children’s Magazine

Excerpt from interview:

You’re currently studying as an MFA student in Writing for Children & Young Adults at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. How important is pre–qualification in our field?

I don’t think there is such a thing as pre-qualification in writing. An MFA does not a guarantee a salaried job once you graduate, of course. And choosing to get one is a very personal decision. The only thing a writer must do is to write very well. And I’m certainly getting those skills at VCFA. I’m not there to write one good book. I’m there to learn the craft of storytelling.

There are certain skills a writer needs to make a career out of telling a good story. The Writing for Children program is very specific and it was the first to offer such a program. I’m surrounded by award-winning faculty and students (Trinidadian writer Lynn Joseph is my classmate). I’m in my second semester and I’ve read nearly a hundred children’s and teens’ books so far. I’ve examined different craft concepts and themes in children’s literature and worked closely on my last manuscript. Rita Williams-Garcia was my last advisor and I’m now working with Susan Fletcher.

I’m a mom of three and I’m forced to carve out a block of time to focus on reading and writing. This has been worth every (loaned) penny! And I’m committed to a life-long career of writing for children so this was a necessary investment.

Last year you won the Gulliver Travel Grant given annually by the Speculative Literature Foundation. How have you used the grant to further your writing career?

The grant did not necessarily further my writing career. It’s a nice addition to a bio or query letter, of course. But it did help the novel that I was writing. I’m writing about Haiti and I needed to be there on the ground to get some of the details correct. I’d been relying on blurry memory and Youtube videos before then. I visited Haiti during Fete Gede, or Day of the Dead, and Gede figures prominently in my novel. The Speculative Literature Foundation does an excellent job of highlighting and supporting genre writers (fantasy and science fiction), and I was truly honored to be their 2011 winner.

You’ve written a fantasy YA novel, Bandit, that’s yet to be published. I love the title of the novel. Can you give us a sneak preview of what it’s about?

Sixteen year-old, Brooklyn-born Anacaona Makandal has the magical gift of being able to teleport things with her mind (stealing) and make things come to life with clay (pottery). Ana comes from a long line of Clay Women and she has also inherited her magical stealing powers from her father, the last Great Bandit of Haiti—a Robin Hood of sorts, who can travel between the world of the living, the world of the spirits (the Vodou loas/deities) and the ancestors—Ginen. She is the only girl in Haitian history to inherit such a gift. A girl isn’t supposed to be a Great Bandit. She’s supposed to fine tune her prodigious sculpting skills to become a Clay Woman like her mother and foremothers.

Do you think there is a gap in the market for genre MG and YA books featuring so-called characters ‘of color’ and is that something you hope to address as a speculative fiction writer?

Yes, there is a serious dearth of multicultural books featuring characters of color, and more specifically, black characters. I can count on one hand how many sci-fi/fantasy books for young readers from diverse backgrounds have been published within the last couple of years. Zetta Elliott does an excellent job at articulating the lack of diversity in the industry.

I was writing speculative short stories for adults first, before this YA boom. I also worked with children and teens as a creative writing teacher. When I realized that some kids had a hard time placing themselves in the future or pulling from their own cultural mythologies to write sci-fi or fantasy, I became more determined to tell these stories where inner-city black and latino kids were the heroes and heroines of their own stories.

You submitted Bandit to the Lee and Low New Visions Award contest which recognizes a debut author of color for a middle grade or young adult science fiction, fantasy, or mystery novel. Now you’re one of three finalists for the award; congratulations! What did you do to prepare your manuscript for submission?

I’ve been writing and calling myself a writer for the last thirteen years (Though things slowed down a bit after the birth of each of my three children). I think the time I’ve put into writing was the best preparation. I also got a chance to work on the first few chapters with my advisor at VCFA. What Lee and Low and Tu Books are doing is tremendous. There had been all these online discussions (and they’re still happening) about diversity in children’s books, and their New Voices and New Visions Awards addressed a serious need. I’m honored to be among the finalists.

The award winner will be announced on March 31. What will you do if you don’t win? What will you do if you do?

I’m still working on my manuscript with my new advisor at VCFA. A book is not done until it’s on a shelf. So I’m learning the very necessary art of re-writing. If I don’t win, I get to work on it some more and make it even better. If I do win, I get to work on it some more and make it even better, but under a contract and a publication date. It’s a win/win situation for me. I’m excited and sincere about the story that I’m telling, so I know it will get into the hands of readers with the help of some amazing folks. I’ve had some great ones who’ve helped me get this far.

Your first picturebook, A is for Ayiti, was recently published by One Moore Book. What have you learned about the art of writing picturebooks that you didn’t know before?

Writing for children is very hard. A is for Ayiti is an ABC book based on Haitian culture using an English alphabet! Edwidge Danticat served as guest editor for the series and I had to go through several edits with her and the amazing publisher, Wayetu Moore. I also learned that there is a great need for more books like these. OMB’s Haiti Series garnered so much support and attention. I’m so glad Wayetu Moore took on this huge task. A is for Ayiti was translated into Kreyol and copies are being sent to Haiti. I was so proud to be a part of this series.

Read the rest of the interview here.  
http://www.summeredward.com/2013/03/publishing-perspectives-ibi-zoboi.html

Anansesem, interview, Writing

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